New York Physical Therapy Ebook Continuing Education

66. The 6-minute walk test is a: a. Submaximal aerobic test. b. Maximal aerobic test. c. Submaximal resistance test. d. Maximal resistance test. 67. Gait speed:

57. Compared to sedentary individuals, older adults who have maintained a high level of fitness throughout their lives can expect: a. An increased VO2max with aging. b. A slower decrease in VO2max with aging. c. A more rapid decrease in VO2max with aging. d. No change in VO2max with aging. 58. Benefits of aerobic exercise in older adults include: a. Increased visceral and intramuscular fat. b. Increased inflammation. a. A maximum of 60 minutes at vigorous intensity. b. A maximum of 300 minutes at moderate intensity. c. A minimum of 150 minutes at vigorous intensity. d. Between 150-300 minutes at moderate intensity. 60. An appropriate intensity for an aerobic activity such as walking would be at: a. Light intensity that does not noticeably increase heart rate or breathing. b. 60% of the individual’s maximal heart rate. c. Moderate intensity that noticeably increases heart rate and breathing. d. 80% of the individual’s maximal heart rate. c. Decreased insulin sensitivity. d. Decreased arterial stiffness. 59. Older adults should exercise weekly: 61. Benefits of resistance exercise in older adults include: a. Decreased blood pressure and decreased visceral adipose tissue. b. Increased blood pressure and decreased visceral adipose tissue. c. Increased insulin resistance and decreased visceral adipose tissue. d. Increased insulin resistance and decreased bone mineral density. 62. Frail older adults who participate in high-intensity resistance exercise can expect: a. To increase muscle mass but not strength. b. To increase both muscle mass and strength. c. That only older women will improve in muscle mass. d. That only older men will improve in muscle mass. 63. Older adults should participate in resistance exercise a minimum of: a. Once per week at light intensity. b. Once per week at moderate intensity. c. Twice per week at moderate intensity. d. Three times per week at light intensity. 64. Eccentric strength training in older adults is: a. Considered an unsafe method of resistance exercise. b. More metabolically demanding than concentric exercise. c. Less metabolically demanding than concentric exercise. d. Beneficial for healthy older adults but unsafe in frail older adults. 65. Ways to overcome common barriers to exercise in older adults include: a. Charging a large fee to join a group exercise class. b. Providing limited instructions to encourage them to exercise on their own. c. Scheduling a set exercise time and providing a group exercise environment. d. Educating them on all the harms exercise may cause.

a. Cannot be improved with exercise. b. Is time-consuming and difficult to measure in older adults. c. Is a traditional measure of aerobic fitness. d. Is a predictor of disability, falls, and mortality in older adults. 68. The 30-second chair stand is: a. A good functional measure of upper extremity strength. b. A good functional measure of lower extremity strength. c. Not a good functional measure of lower extremity strength in older adults and should not be used. d. A good functional measure of lower extremity strength but is a time-consuming and difficult test to use. 69. A patient with an absolute contraindication to exercise: a. Should only exercise under the direct supervision of a OT/OTA or PT/PTA. b. Is safe to exercise at home at a moderate intensity. c. Is unsafe to perform any exercise until his or her condition is brought under better medical control. d. Will never be safe to exercise again and should be discouraged from all participation in exercise. 70. Medical clearance is recommended: a. Prior to the start of a new exercise program for anyone with a history of cardiovascular, metabolic, or renal disease. b. Prior to the start of a new exercise program for all adults over the age of 45. c. Only for men starting a vigorous exercise program. d. Only for those with a history of heart disease who are starting a moderate exercise program. 71. Older adults with diabetes should not exercise: a. If their blood sugar is below 300 mg/dL. b. If their blood sugar is above 100 mg/dL. c. Because exercise is never safe for those with diabetes. d. Prior to checking their blood sugar if they are on insulin. 72. Older adults with dementia: a. Should not exercise because the health risk is too great. b. May benefit from caregiver assistance with exercise and frequent short bouts of activity. c. Will be unable to participate in any type of exercise due to agitation and decreased cognition. d. Traditionally have high compliance with an exercise program.

Course Code: PTNY02TE

Page 109

Book Code: PTNY1024

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